Annotation 2020-09-09 154506

Creative Mindfulness

Resources to help you relax and refocus.

Creative Mindfulness resources

This year has been tough on mental wellbeing. For young people at school, the disruptions to their education, school life and sense of normality have been significant. In support of the recovery curriculum, these free Creative Mindfulness activities have been designed to help students relax, recuperate, and refocus in school time, as well as to inspire creativity. Included are 7 video activities, and a downloadable resource that can be printed out and taken home. We encourage teachers to use these videos in the classroom as a lesson starter for any subject, to begin or end the day, or as a creative prompt for art lessons.

Each of the 7 activities have been broken down into step by step chapters you can join in with; the activities take 5-10 minutes. The resources are suitable for KS3 students, but students and adults of all ages can use these resources to find a moment of creative calm.

If your class takes part in these workshops, please help us to shape our future learning activity by filling in this very quick survey.

What is Creative Mindfulness?

Do you ever notice that when you’re drawing or making something, the time flies by? Sometimes, it is just the process of doing something creative that is enjoyable, rather than the finished result. This is what creative mindfulness is all about.

The activities in these videos can help you to practice being “mindful”. This just means paying attention to ourselves, our thoughts and feelings, and what is going on around us so that we can be in the present moment. Being in the present moment means that your head is focused on what is going on right now, rather than thinking about what happened yesterday or what you’re doing this weekend. Being mindful helps you to focus and concentrate. Sometimes, it can help you relax. Other times, it can help you to notice if you’re worried or distracted, and to let those thoughts go.

Being mindful takes some concentration, and you will notice your thoughts drifting when you practice it. Whenever this happens, acknowledge the thoughts you are having – try to imagine you are observing them – and put them aside. Use the activity you are doing as an “anchor” to bring you back to the present moment.

Click on the links below to visit each Creative Mindfulness activity: